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Edwards’s Pheasant

(Lophura edwardsi)

 

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Critically Endangered (IUCN 3.1)

Kingdom:Animalia

Phylum:Chordata

Class:Aves

Order:Galliformes

Family:Phasianidae

Genus:Lophura

Species:

L. edwardsi

Binomial name

Lophura edwardsi

(Oustalet, 1896)

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Endemic to the rainforests of Vietnam. It is named after the French ornithologist Alphonse Milne-Edwards and first described to science in 1896[2] The bird's length is 58–65 centimetres (23–26 in) [3] and has red legs and facial skin. The male is mainly blue-black with a crest, and the female is a drab brown bird. The alarm call is a puk!-puk!-puk!.

There are two varieties; the nominate form L. e. edwardsi has a white crest and upper tail, whereas the northern form, usually called Vietnamese pheasant, is found with a variable number of white rectrices. This difference in the two forms may be due to inbreeding of a restricted, fragmented population there, and has also been seen in captive, inbred L. edwardsi.

In 2012 the nominate form of Edwards's pheasant have been uplisted to Critically Endangered by BirdLife International, having suffered from deforestation, hunting and the use of defoliants during the Vietnam War. The population is currently believed to number between 50 and 249 birds in the wild, mostly of the nominate form, but it is doing well in captivity, where it is the subject of ex-situ conservation. There have been no confirmed sightings since 2000 and in 2010 the World Pheasant Association (WPA) received funding from the Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund to survey forests in the central Vietnam provinces of Quảng Bình and Quảng Trị.

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Blue-and-Gold Macaw

(Ara ararauna)

"Maui"

 

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Least Concern (IUCN 3.1)[1]

Scientific classification

Kingdom:Animalia

Phylum:Chordata

Class:Aves

Order:Psittaciformes

Family:Psittacidae

Genus:Ara

Species:

A. ararauna

Binomial name

Ara ararauna

(Linnaeus, 1758)

Size: length of 76 - 91.5 cm (30 - 36 inches), and a wingspan ranging between 41 - 45 inches (104 - 114 cm). They weigh between 28 - 64 oz (0.8 - 1.8 kg)

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Life Expectancy: most only live 30 - 35 years.A female Blue and Gold Macaw named Charlie is reported to have hatched in 1899 and, accordingly, in 2011, she celebrated her 112th birthday. She is said to have once belonged to Winston Churchill. This Blue and Gold Macaw has gained fame for her anti-Nazi cursing. Charlie resides at Heathfield Nurseries, Reigate, Surrey in Great Britain.

Diet: 

various seeds, nuts, fruits (particularly the fruits of palms), and possibly some vegetable matter. Their strong beaks are able to crack even the hardest nut shells and crush seeds.

They are also commonly observed consuming clay found at riverbanks, which allows them to digest toxins from ingested unripe seeds.

Habitat:swampy forests of tropical South America

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Reproduction: reproductive age when they are about 3 to 4 years old. Once they have found a suitable mate, they are generally monogamousJanuary through July (in the United States between March and September). They usually breed every 1 to 2 years.

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Size at birth: hatchlings weigh about 0.5 - 0.7 oz (14 - 20 g) and are blind, featherless and completely dependent on parental care. For the first week, the female alone feeds the young through regurgitation and after that time, the male will usually assist. About 10 days later, the young develop feathers .Both parents are very protective of their young and aggressively defend them against intruders. The young fledge (leave) the nest when they are about 90 to 100 days old. By the time they start feeding on their own (wean), they weigh about 35 oz (1,000 g).

The bare face is white, turning pink in excited birds and wrinkled as they age. This bare area is lined with small dark green ranging to black feathers.feet are zygodactylous (with 2 toes pointing forward and 2 toes pointing backward)

 

 

 

 

 

A large South American parrot with mostly blue top parts and light orange underparts, with gradient hues of green on top of its head. It is a member of the large group of neotropical parrots known as macaws. It inhabits forest (especially varzea, but also in open sections of terra firme or unflooded forest), woodland and savannah of tropical South America. They are popular in aviculture because of their striking color, ability to talk, ready availability in the marketplace, and close bonding to humans.

These birds can reach a length of 76–86 cm (30–34 in) and weigh 0.900–1.5 kg (2–3 lb), making them some of the larger members of their family. They are vivid in appearance with bright aqua blue feathers on the top of their body except for the head, which is lime colored. The bottom, however, is a rich deep yellow/light orange. Their beak is black, as well as the feathers under their chin. Its feet are of a gray color, save for black talons. The bird has white skin, with its face having nearly no feathers beside a few black ones spaced apart from each other forming a striped pattern around the eyes. The irises are pale light yellow.

Blue-and-yellow macaws can live from 30 to 35 years in the wild, and reach sexual maturity between the ages of 3 and 6 years.

Little variation in plumage is seen across the range. Some birds have a more orange or "butterscotch" underside color, particularly on the breast. This was often seen in Trinidad birds and others of the Caribbean area. The blue-and-yellow macaw uses its powerful beak for breaking nutshells, and for climbing up and hanging from trees.

The blue-and-yellow macaw generally mates for life. They nest almost exclusively in dead palms and most nests are in Mauritia flexuosa palms. The female typically lays two or three eggs. The female incubates the eggs for about 28 days. One chick is dominant and gets most of the food; the others perish in the nest. Chicks fledge from the nest about 97 days after hatching. The male bird's color signals readiness for breeding. The brighter and bolder the colors, the better the chance of getting a mate.

Even well-tended blue-and-yellow macaws are known to "scream" for attention, and make other loud noises. Loud vocalizations, especially "flock calls", and destructive chewing are natural parts of their behavior and should be expected in captivity. Due to their large size, they also require plentiful space in which to fly around. According to World Parrot Trust, an enclosure for a blue-and-yellow macaw should, if possible, be at least 15 m (50 ft) in length. Captive macaws, kept with good diet, exercise, and veterinary care are known to have lived 60 or more years.

East African Grey Crowned Crane

(Balearica regulorum)

Namazzi & Gonza

 

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