google-site-verification=D2qXj0oq3BL9x5-Anr0vMzgA94LmiD7dTx_1g00H3bs
 

Wriggles Cabin

African Spurred Tortoise

aka Sulcata Tortoise

 (Centrochelys sulcata)

"Scooter & Gaby"

 

Click the carousel to enlarge & scroll.

To play, press and hold the enter key. To stop, release the enter key.

Conservation-Status-Chart.png

Vulnerable (IUCN 2.3)[1]

Order: Testudines

Suborder: Cryptodira

Superfamily: Testudinoidea

Family: Testudinidae

Genus: Centrochelys

Species: C. sulcata

Binomial name:

Centrochelys sulcata

(Miller, 1779)

Size: 

Weight: 

Life Expectancy: 

Diet: 

Habitat:

Activity Cycle: 

Range: 

Reproduction: 

Social Structure:

Number of young at birth: 

Age of maturity: 

Size at birth: 

 

 

 

 

 

The African spurred tortoise (Centrochelys sulcata), also called the sulcata tortoise, is a species of tortoise, which inhabits the southern edge of the Sahara desert, in Africa. It is the third-largest species of tortoise in the world, the largest species of mainland tortoise, and the only extant species in the genus Centrochelys.C. sulcata is the third-largest species of tortoise in the world after the Galapagos tortoise, and Aldabra giant tortoise, and the largest of the mainland tortoises. Bill Branch reported a maximum size in the wild as 83 cm and 98 kg, but others state that they can reach 105 kg (231 lb). They grow from hatchling size (2–3 in) very quickly, reaching 6-10 in (15–25 cm) within the first few years of their lives. They can live more than 70 years.[Sulcata tortoises are herbivores. Primarily, their diets consist of many types of grasses and plants, high in fiber and very low in protein. Flowers and other plants including cactus pads can be consumed. The African spurred tortoise is native to the Sahara Desert and the Sahel, a transitional ecoregion of semiarid grasslands, savannas, and thorn shrublands found in the countries of Burkina Faso, Chad, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Mali, Somalia, Mauritania, Nigeria, Senegal, and Sudan. In these arid regions, the tortoise excavates burrows in the ground to get to areas with higher moisture levels, and spends the hottest part of the day in these burrows. This is known as aestivation. In the wild, they may burrow very deep; up to 15 m deep and 30 m long. Plants such as grasses and succulents grow around their burrows if kept moist and in nature continue to grow for the tortoise to eat if the soil is replenished with its feces.Its specific name sulcata is from the Latin word sulcus meaning "furrow" and refers to the furrows on the tortoise's scales.

Ambanja Panther Chameleon

(Furcifer pardalis)

 

Click the carousel to enlarge & scroll.

To play, press and hold the enter key. To stop, release the enter key.

Conservation-Status-Chart.png

Least Concern (IUCN 3.1)[1]

Class: Reptilia

Order: Squamata

Suborder: Iguania

Family: Chamaeleonidae

Genus: Furcifer

Species: F. pardalis

Binomial name:

Furcifer pardalis

(Cuvier, 1829)

Size: 

Weight: 

Life Expectancy: 

Diet: 

Habitat:

Activity Cycle: 

Range: 

Reproduction: 

Social Structure:

Number of young at birth: 

Age of maturity: 

Size at birth: 

 

 

 

 

 

Ambanja Panther Chameleons are a locality from northwest Madagascar. Male Ambanja Panther Chameleon specimens are known to show lots of blue, green and red. Their body is typically green to blue with either red or blue barring. Body coloration can also show yellow and the eyes typically have red radiation patterns.Coloration varies with location, and the different color patterns of panther chameleons are commonly referred to as 'locales', which are named after the geographical location in which they are found. Panther chameleons from the areas of Nosy Be, Ankify, and Ambanja are typically a vibrant blue, and those from Ambilobe, Antsiranana, and Sambava are red, green or orange. The areas of Maroantsetra and Tamatave yield primarily red specimens. Numerous other color phases and patterns occur between and within regions. Females generally remain tan and brown with hints of pink, peach, or bright orange, no matter where they are found, but there are slight differences in patterns and colors among the different color phases.

Panther chameleons are zygodactylous: on each foot, the five toes are fused into a group of two and a group of three, giving the foot a tongs-like appearance. These specialized feet allow the panther chameleon a tight grip on narrow branches. Each toe is equipped with a sharp claw to gain traction on surfaces such as bark when climbing. The claws make it easy to see how many toes are fused into each part of the foot — two toes on the outside of each front foot and three on the inside.

Their eyes are the most distinctive among the reptiles and function like a gun turret. The upper and lower eyelids are joined, with only a pinhole large enough for the pupil to see through. They can rotate and focus separately to observe two different objects simultaneously; their eyes move independently from each other. It in effect gives them a full 360-degree arc of vision around their bodies. When prey is located, both eyes can be focused in the same direction, giving sharp stereoscopic vision and depth perception. They have keen eyesight for reptiles, letting them see small insects from a long (5–10-m) distance. Ultraviolet light is part of the visible spectrum for chameleons.Panther chameleons have very long tongues (sometimes longer than their own body length) which they are capable of rapidly extending out of the mouth. The tongue extends at around 26 body lengths per second. The tongue hits the prey in about 0.0030 sec. The tongue of the chameleon is a complex arrangement of bone, muscle and sinew. At the base of the tongue, a bone is shot forward, giving the tongue the initial momentum it needs to reach the prey quickly. At the tip of this elastic tongue, a muscular, club-like structure covered in thick mucus forms a suction cup. Once the tip sticks to a prey item, it is drawn quickly back into the mouth, where the panther chameleon's strong jaws crush it and it is consumed.

Female Panther Chameleons

(Furcifer pardalis)

Click the carousel to enlarge & scroll.

To play, press and hold the enter key. To stop, release the enter key.

Ambilobe Panther Chameleon

(Furcifer pardalis)

(DeadheadxSpiderman)

"Kale aka Kaleidescope"

 

Click the carousel to enlarge & scroll.

To play, press and hold the enter key. To stop, release the enter key.

Conservation-Status-Chart.png

Least Concern (IUCN 3.1)[1]

Class: Reptilia

Order: Squamata

Suborder: Iguania

Family: Chamaeleonidae

Genus: Furcifer

Species: F. pardalis

Binomial name

Furcifer pardalis

(Cuvier, 1829)

Size: 

Weight: 

Life Expectancy: 

Diet: 

Habitat:

Activity Cycle: 

Range: 

Reproduction: 

Social Structure:

Number of young at birth: 

Age of maturity: 

Size at birth: 

 

 

 

 

 

Ambilobes have the largest variety of color of all the Furcifer pardalis. Ambilobe is a locality from northwest Madagascar between Ambanja and Diego Suarez. Ambilobe Panther Chameleons are occasionally referred to as Sirama Panther Chameleons after the neighboring town as well as by the designer name “Picasso” Panther Chameleons. This locale is generally divided into two main color patterns – Blue-bar Ambilobes and Red-bar Ambilobes. The overall color combinations are quite variable and consist of green, blue, yellow, orange and red but the red- and blue-bar ambilobes are divided based on the primary color of their bars.

Argentine Black and White Tegu

(Salvator merianae)

"Yaco"

 

Click the carousel to enlarge & scroll.

To play, press and hold the enter key. To stop, release the enter key.

Conservation-Status-Chart.png

Least Concern (IUCN 3.1)[1]

Class: Reptilia

Order: Squamata

Family: Teiidae

Genus: Salvator

Species: S. merianae

Binomial name

Salvator merianae

(A.M.C. Duméril & Bibron, 1839)

Size: 

Weight: 

Life Expectancy: 

Diet: 

Habitat:

Activity Cycle: 

Range: 

Reproduction: 

Social Structure:

Number of young at birth: 

Age of maturity: 

Size at birth: 

 

 

 

 

 

Also commonly called the Argentine giant tegu, the black and white tegu, the huge tegu, and lagarto overo in Spanish is a species of lizard in the family Teiidae. The species is the largest of the "tegu lizards". It is an omnivorous species which inhabits the tropical rain forests, savannas, and semi-deserts of eastern and central South America.

Tegus are sometimes kept as pets. They are notable for their unusually high intelligence and can also be house-broken. Like other reptiles, tegus go into brumation in autumn when the temperature drops. They exhibit a high level of activity during their wakeful period of the year.

Tegus fill ecological niches similar to those of monitor lizards, and are an example of convergent evolution.

As a hatchling, Salvator merianae has an emerald green color from the tip of its snout to midway down its neck, with black markings. The emerald green becomes black several months after shedding. As a young tegu, the tail is banded yellow and black; as it ages, the solid yellow bands nearest to the body change to areas of weak speckling. Fewer solid bands indicates an older animal. A tegu can drop a section of its tail as a distraction if attacked. The tail is also used as a weapon to swipe at an aggressor; even a half-hearted swipe can leave a bruise.

Tegus are capable of running at high speeds and can run bipedally for short distances. They often use this method in territorial defense, with the mouth open and front legs held wide to look more threatening.

Adult males are much larger than the females and can reach 3 ft (92 cm) in length at maturity. They may continue to grow to lengths of 4.0–4.5 ft (120–140 cm).

The females are much smaller, but may grow up to 3 ft in length, from nose to tail. They have beaded skin and stripes running down their bodies. Adult females can reach a weight of 2.5–7.0 kg (5.5–15.4 lb).

Salvator merianae has recently been shown to be one of the few partially warm-blooded lizards, having a temperature up to 10 °C (18 °F) higher than the ambient temperature at night time. However, unlike true endotherms such as mammals and birds, these lizards only display temperature control during their reproductive season (September to December), so are said to possess seasonal reproductive endothermy. Because convergent evolution is one of the strongest lines of evidence for the adaptive significance of a trait, the discovery of reproductive endothermy in this lizard not only complements the long known reproductive endothermy observed in some species of pythons, but also supports the hypothesis that the initial selective benefit for endothermy in birds and mammals was reproductive.

Tegus are omnivorous. Juvenile tegus in the wild have been observed to eat a wide range of invertebrates, including insects, spiders, and snails. They also eat fruits and seeds. As they grow they become more predatory and the protein content of their diet rises. They may seek out eggs from other reptiles and from birds' nests, and will eat small birds and other vertebrates. In adulthood tegus continue to eat insects and wild fruits, and it is assumed that such components include desirable or essential nutrients.

In captivity, tegus commonly are fed high protein diets that include raw or cooked flesh such as ground turkey, canned & dry dog food, commercial crocodile diet, chicken, eggs, insects, and small rodents. The inclusion of fruit in the diet is recommended. Though some captive tegus do not readily eat fruit, others enjoy banana, grapes, mango, and papaya. However, there is evidence that, as in most husbandry of carnivores, it is good practice to cook most of the egg in the diet, so as to denature the protein avidin, that occurs in the albumen. Raw avidin immobilizes biotin, so excessive feeding of raw eggs may cause fatal biotin deficiency.

As adults, they have blunted teeth and exaggerated lateral pterygoidal muscles which allow them to be generalist feeders. In captivity, they have been observed eating various feeder insects like mealworms, superworms, earthworms, silkworms, crickets and roaches, as well as vertebrate prey like mice, rats, fish, turkey (offered in a ground form), rabbit, quail, and chicks. Crustaceans such as crayfish are also readily consumed. Like all lizards, blue tegus need a properly balanced diet; incomplete prey items such as insects or ground meat require dusting with a mineral/multi-vitamin supplement. Vitamin deficiencies can lead to trouble shedding skin, lethargy and weight loss; a calcium deficiency can lead to metabolic bone disease, which can be fatal.

Predators of tegus are pumas, otters, jaguars, snakes, and birds of prey.

In 2012, the black and white tegu was reassigned to the resurrected genus Salvator as Salvator merianae.

S. merianae is called the "Argentine black and white tegu" to distinguish it from the "Colombian black and white tegu", which is another name for the gold tegu. Unscrupulous or incompetent pet dealers sometimes pass off gold tegus as black and white tegus.

S. merianae and T. teguixin can be distinguished by skin texture and scale count:

  • S. merianae has two loreal scales between eye and nostril.

  • T. teguixin has only a single loreal scale between eye and nostril.

  • S. merianae has round pupils, whereas Tupinambis species have reniform pupils.

Argentine Horned Frog 

(Ceratophrys ornata)

 aka Argentine Wide-Mouthed Frog 

"Barr"

 

Click the carousel to enlarge & scroll.

To play, press and hold the enter key. To stop, release the enter key.

Conservation-Status-Chart.png

Near Threatened (IUCN 3.1)

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Amphibia

Order: Anura

Family: Ceratophryidae

Genus: Ceratophrys

Species: C. ornata

Binomial name

Ceratophrys ornata

(Bell, 1843)

Size: 

Weight: 

Life Expectancy: 

Diet: 

Habitat:

Activity Cycle: 

Range: 

Reproduction: 

Social Structure:

Number of young at birth: 

Age of maturity: 

Size at birth: 

 

 

 

 

 

The Argentine horned frog (Ceratophrys ornata), also known as the Argentine wide-mouthed frog or the ornate pacman frog, is a species of frog in the family Ceratophryidae. The species is endemic to South America. It is the most common species of horned frog, in the grasslands of Argentina, Uruguay and Brazil. A voracious eater, it will attempt to swallow anything that moves close to its wide mouth, such as insects, rodents, lizards, and other frogs, even if this predator would suffocate in the process. It is also kept as an exotic pet. The nickname "pacman frog" is a reference to the popular 1980's arcade game Pac-Man, where Pac-Man himself eats quite a lot, and has a mouth that takes up most of its body, much like the Argentine horned frog.The females of C. ornata can grow to be 16.5 centimeters (6.5 inches) snout to vent (SV) and the males 11.5 centimeters (4.5 in) SV. The average lifespan is 6 to 7 years, however, they can live up to 10 years or more in captivity. A horned frog's most prominent feature is its mouth, which accounts for roughly half of the animal's overall size. Coloration is typically bright green with red markings, though dark green, parti-color black and albino versions also exist. Sexing this species is very difficult before sexual maturity is reached. Dimorphism traits between the two sexes are size difference and males possessing dark pigmented throats and nuptial pads on the forelimbs.

All horned frogs, species of the genus Ceratophrys, hunt by remaining motionless, and waiting for prey. They will try to eat anything that can fit in their mouths, and some things that can't. In the wild, their typical diet would include rodents such as mice, small reptiles, as well as large spiders, and insects such as locusts.

Horned frogs are well known for their fearless reputation. They will attempt to consume animals, sometimes even the size of themselves. If threatened by a larger animal such as a human, these frogs can deliver a painful bite as they have several odontoid projections (not teeth per se) along their bottom and top jaws. Sometimes they will even jump towards their attacker, no matter their size and power.

Asian Water Monitor

(Varanus salvator)

"Kuro"

 

Click the carousel to enlarge & scroll.

To play, press and hold the enter key. To stop, release the enter key.

Conservation-Status-Chart.png

Least Concern (IUCN 3.1)[1]

Class: Reptilia

Order: Squamata

Family: Varanidae

Genus: Varanus

Subgenus: Soterosaurus

Species: V. salvator

Binomial name

Varanus salvator

(Laurenti, 1768)

Size: 

Weight: 

Life Expectancy: 

Diet: 

Habitat:

Activity Cycle: 

Range: 

Reproduction: 

Social Structure:

Number of young at birth: 

Age of maturity: 

Size at birth: 

 

 

 

 

 

also called common water monitor, is a large varanid lizard native to South and Southeast Asia. It is one of the most common monitor lizards in Asia, ranging from Sri Lanka and coastal northeast India to Indochina, Malay Peninsula, and Indonesian islands where it lives close to water. It is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List. It was described by Laurenti in 1768 and is among the largest squamates in the world.

The Asian water monitor is also called Malayan water monitor, common water monitor, two-banded monitor, rice lizard, ring lizard, plain lizard and no-mark lizard, as well as simply water monitor.

V. s. salvator, the Asian water monitor, is the nominate subspecies and is now restricted to Sri Lanka, where it is known as the kabaragoya in Sinhala and kalawathan in Tamil.

The water monitor is a large species of monitor lizard. Breeding maturity is attained for males when they are a relatively modest 40 cm (16 in) long and weigh 1 kg (2.2 lb), and for females at 50 cm (20 in). However, they grow much larger throughout life, with males being larger than females.[13] Adults rarely exceed 1.5–2 m (4.9–6.6 ft) in length, but the largest specimen on record, from Sri Lanka, measured 3.21 m (10.5 ft). A common mature weight of V. salvator can be 19.5 kg (43 lb). However, 80 males killed for the leather trade in Sumatra averaged only 3.42 kg (7.5 lb) and 56.6 cm (22.3 in) snout-to-vent and 142 cm (56 in) in total length; 42 females averaged only 3.52 kg (7.8 lb) and 59 cm (23 in) snout-to-vent and 149.6 cm (58.9 in) in total length, although unskinned outsized specimens weighed 16 to 20 kg (35 to 44 lb). Another study from the same area by the same authors similarly estimated mean body mass for mature specimens at 20 kg (44 lb) while yet another study found a series of adults to weigh 7.6 kg (17 lb). The maximum weight of the species is over 50 kg (110 lb). In exceptional cases, the species has been reported to reach 75 to 90 kg (165 to 198 lb), though most such reports are unverified and may be unreliable. They are the world's second-heaviest lizard, after the Komodo dragon. Their bodies are muscular, with long, powerful, laterally compressed tails. The scales in this species are keeled; scales found on top of the head have been noted to be larger than those located on the back. Water monitors are often defined by their dark brown or blackish coloration with yellow spots found on their underside- these yellow markings have a tendency to disappear gradually with age. This species is also denoted by the blackish band with yellow edges extending back from each eye. These monitors have very long necks and an elongated snout. They use their powerful jaws, serrated teeth and sharp claws for both predation and defense. In captivity, Asian water monitors' life expectancy has been determined to be anywhere between 11–25 years depending on conditions, in the wild it is considerably shorter

Asian water monitors are semi aquatic and opportunistic; they inhabit a variety of natural habitats though predominantly this species resides in primary forests and mangrove swamps. It has been noted that these monitors are not deterred from living in areas of human disturbance. In fact, they have been known to adapt and thrive in agricultural areas as well as cities with canal systems (such as in Sri Lanka, where they are not hunted or persecuted by humans). This species does not thrive in habitats with extensive loss of natural vegetation and aquatic resources. Habitats that are considered to be most important to this species are mangrove vegetation, swamps, wetlands, and altitudes below 1000 meters.

Like the Komodo dragon, the water monitor will often eat carrion. They have a keen sense of smell and can smell a carcass from far away. They are known to feed on dead human bodies. While on the one hand their presence can be helpful in locating a missing person in forensic investigations, on the other hand they can inflict further injuries to the corpse, complicating ascertainment of the cause of death.

The possibility of venom in the genus Varanus is widely debated. Previously, venom was thought to be unique to Serpentes (snakes) and Heloderma (venomous lizards). The aftereffects of a Varanus bite were thought to be due to oral bacteria alone, but recent studies have shown venom glands are likely to be present in the mouths of several, if not all, of the species. The venom may be used as a defensive mechanism to fend off predators, to help digest food, to sustain oral hygiene, and possibly to help in capturing and killing prey.

Adult water monitors have few natural predators, and are only known to be preyed on by saltwater crocodiles.

Water monitors defend themselves using their tails, claws, and jaws. They are excellent swimmers, using the raised fin on their tails to steer through water. They are carnivores, and consume a wide range of prey. They are known to eat fish, frogs, rodents, birds, crabs, and snakes. They have also been known to eat turtles, as well as young crocodiles and crocodile eggs. Water monitors have been observed eating catfish in a fashion similar to a mammalian carnivore, tearing off chunks of meat with their sharp teeth while holding it with their front legs and then separating different parts of the fish for sequential consumption.

In dominantly aquatic habitats their semi aquatic behavior is considered to provide a measure of safety from predators. Paired with their generalist diet, this is thought to contribute to their ecological plasticity. When hunted by predators such as the king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) they will climb trees using their powerful legs and claws. If this evasion is not enough to escape danger, they have also been known to jump from trees into streams for safety, a tactic similar to that of the green iguana (Iguana iguana).

Monitor lizards are traded globally and are the most common type of lizard to be exported from Southeast Asia, with 8.1 million exported between 1998 and 2007. The Asian water monitor is one of the most exploited varanids; its skin is used for fashion accessories such as shoes, belts and handbags which are shipped globally, with as many as 1.5 million skins traded annually. Other uses include a perceived remedy for skin ailments and eczema, novelty food in Indonesia, and a perceived aphrodisiac, and as pets.

In Sri Lanka, it is protected by local people who value its predation of "crabs that would otherwise undermine the banks of rice fields". It is also protected as it eats venomous snakes.

Blue Poison Arrow Frog

(Dendrobates tinctorius "azureus")

"Cosmic & Cobalt"

 

Click the carousel to enlarge & scroll.

To play, press and hold the enter key. To stop, release the enter key.